NFL

Fantasy Football: Zachariason's Post-Draft Rookie Rankings

If your dynasty roster came out of the NFL draft completely unscathed, consider yourself lucky.

We thought we could maybe get a full season of Damien Williams as a workhorse, but the Chiefs had other plans. Kerryon Johnson? Yeah, his upside is toast. Marlon Mack? Who?

Because of this year's rookie class, the fantasy football landscape has completely changed.

But which newcomers should you be targeting in rookie drafts? How did things change from the pre-draft process until now?

Let's take a look.

1. Clyde Edwards-Helaire, RB, Kansas City Chiefs

Positional Rank: 1
Pre-Draft Rank: 7
Tier: 1

Before the draft started, my pre-draft rankings had Clyde Edwards-Helaire as the seventh overall pick in rookie drafts. Now he's first.

How?

Patrick Mahomes is how.

The CEH position pre-draft wasn't a reflection of his skill -- he could've been placed fifth overall with no issues on my end. Landing in the perfect spot to showcase his pass-catching skillset with the greatest young quarterback of all time is what pushes his fantasy value to the top of this list. Edwards-Helaire, in the best offense in the country last year, still managed to capture the third-best final-season reception share among running backs in this year's class. He'll be utilized heavily as a receiver in the Kansas City offense, especially once Damien Williams is out of town.

And offensive situation is important for all positions in fantasy football, especially running back. According to some research done for Episode 218 of The Late-Round Podcast, of the 90th percentile running back seasons over the last decade in fantasy points per game, 50% of those campaigns came from running backs in top-10 offenses. Only 5% of them came from offenses that finished worse than 25th. With Mahomes, you get incredible safety for Edwards-Helaire.

2. Jonathan Taylor, RB, Indianapolis Colts

Positional Rank: 2
Pre-Draft Overall Rank: 1
Tier: 1

When Round 1 of the draft ended, Edwards-Helaire seemed like the obvious, zero-debate first pick in rookie drafts this year. Who, combined with what landing spot, could possibly leapfrog a pass-catching back in an Andy Reid offense with Patrick Mahomes?

Jonathan Taylor being selected by the Colts gives Edwards-Helaire some competition.

Taylor was my top rookie draft pick pre-draft, so clearly, my analytical, nerdy self is high on him. His profile compared favorably to Ezekiel Elliott's, but there were concerns that teams may not view Taylor as much of a pass-catcher after only catching 42 passes during his three years at Wisconsin. His final-season reception share was still well over 10%, though, which is an above-average number.

With only Marlon Mack -- who's on the last year of his rookie deal -- ahead of him on the depth chart for early-down work, Taylor has as good of a chance as anyone to lead rookie backs in fantasy points this year. The Colts' running backs, after all, ranked first in rushing Success Rate according to numberFire's expected points model last season. As awesome as CEH's landing spot is, Taylor's not far behind.

3. J.K. Dobbins, RB, Baltimore Ravens

Positional Rank: 3
Pre-Draft Overall Rank: 6
Tier: 2

Within my prospect model, yards per team play is the most predictive metric for running backs. And of the running backs who entered the draft this year, Dobbins' final-season mark within the metric of 2.11 ranked second behind only Jonathan Taylor. He lands in a spot where he may not see a ton of immediate production with Mark Ingram in the mix, but Ingram will be 31 years old at the end of the season. Dobbins is the future of the Baltimore backfield, and it's an advantageous position to be in -- Ravens' backs ranked ninth in Success Rate last season, eighth in fantasy points scored, and first in yards per carry. Having Lamar Jackson opens things up for the team's running backs, and Dobbins' experience with RPO plays makes him a great fit in Baltimore.

4. D'Andre Swift, RB, Detroit Lions

Positional Rank: 4
Pre-Draft Overall Rank: 2
Tier: 3

Detroit wasn't an ideal landing spot for D'Andre Swift's short-term fantasy football outlook. Going to the Lions means Swift will likely split a backfield with Kerryon Johnson over the next two seasons, limiting his upside. He's likely a better back than Johnson, though. According to my prospect model, Swift ranks as a 92nd percentile back, when Johnson was in the 89th percentile coming out. And the Lions wouldn't have taken an early-second round pick and spent it on Swift if they thought they had something special with Johnson.

My top comparable for Swift has been Miles Sanders, who also started his NFL career in a running back-by-committee system. Like Sanders, when given the opportunity, I'd expect Swift to be just fine as both an early-down runner and pass-catcher. As is the case with most running backs in this class, you may have to be patient for Swift to really pay off.

5. Cam Akers, RB, Los Angeles Rams

Positional Rank: 5
Pre-Draft Overall Rank: 5
Tier: 3

I do think there's an easy argument to be made that Cam Akers should be ahead of Swift on this list. Both players are likely going to be committee backs in the short term, and we've seen the Rams -- albeit with Todd Gurley -- rank fourth in each of the past two years in goal-line rushes. Akers is the type of back who should be able to do it all for LA after compiling an above-average yards per team play rate last season while maintaining a near 11% reception share. You also have to think that if the Rams really liked what they had in Darrell Henderson, they would've not only given him the rock more in 2019, but they also likely wouldn't have spent a second-rounder to get Akers. He's a do-it-all back who has a chance to make a fantasy impact right away.

6. CeeDee Lamb, WR, Dallas Cowboys

Positional Rank: 1
Pre-Draft Overall Rank: 4
Tier: 3

Entering the draft, CeeDee Lamb and Jerry Jeudy were neck and neck to be the WR1 in this class. I opted for Jeudy, using my model as the tiebreaker. That same model still favors Jeudy slightly, but I'm swapping positions post-draft and going with Lamb.

The plain and simple reason is landing spot. Generally speaking, using landing spot matters less at wide receiver than it does running back. But Lamb should plug right into the slot role for the highly-efficient Cowboys, where Randall Cobb saw 83 targets and a 14.4% target share last year. If Dallas continues to be as pass-heavy as they were last year -- and the move to get Lamb shows they probably will be -- then Lamb should be fine in the short term despite the crowded receiving room.

We have to also ask ourselves, "What if CeeDee Lamb just emerges as the best wideout on that team?" It's very possible given his talent. And it's very possible that Amari Cooper isn't a Cowboy after 2021, since Dallas doesn't owe him anything after that season. That means Year 3 has the potential to be a huge one for Lamb.

7. Jerry Jeudy, WR, Denver Broncos

Positional Rank: 2
Pre-Draft Overall Rank: 3
Tier: 3

Jeudy's destination may look iffy at first glance, but he's a great complement to Courtland Sutton. You could almost look at Sutton and Jeudy like Julio Jones and Calvin Ridley, with Sutton being worse than Jones and Jeudy having more upside than Ridley. As we know, Ridley's been plenty relevant in fantasy football.

Now, obviously, the Broncos aren't likely to be as pass-heavy as the Falcons, and Drew Lock is still a big question mark for the offense. Even in Year 1, though, Jeudy can see 80-plus targets and be a usable fantasy football piece. And that's with just a 16% target share.

Admittedly, Jeudy's the best wide receiver from this class within my prospect model. He ranks as a 97th percentile player, when Lamb (and a couple of others, who you'll see next) are in the 95th percentile. Since 2010, 80% of the wide receivers who've ranked as high as Jeudy have given us at least one top-20 fantasy season.

8. Jalen Reagor, WR, Philadelphia Eagles

Positional Rank: 3
Pre-Draft Overall Rank: 8
Tier: 4

Reagor's somewhat of a volatile prospect, and going to Philadelphia -- given their recent history with wide receiver selections -- may not make you feel comfortable selecting him in a rookie draft. But, according to my model, he's right there with CeeDee Lamb as a prospect. Using best-season data, Reagor had the sixth-best stat score in the model, and he gets a little more juice as a prospect given his punt and kick return experience. It's not a good sign that his market share numbers dipped last year, but per Pro Football Focus (PFF), "only 30.7% of Reagor’s targets in 2019 were charted as accurate. Only three other FBS receivers had it worse this past season."

He may not be heavily utilized in Year 1, but we know the Eagles have an aging wide receiver group, and there's an easy path to Reagor being the team's top wideout in 2021.

9. Justin Jefferson, WR, Minnesota Vikings

Positional Rank: 4
Pre-Draft Overall Rank: 9
Tier: 4

Justin Jefferson dominated the slot at LSU. According to PFF, he only played five snaps out wide in 2019. In turn, he ended up ranking first in all of college football in slot receptions and slot yards.

He'll likely play that role in the short-term future for Minnesota, but we shouldn't pretend he can't evolve into a more well-rounded receiver. The downside is that the Vikings could continue to be a fairly run-heavy team, which would limit volume, but Jefferson's got a chance to be a better version of Cooper Kupp for fantasy football purposes.

10. Ke'Shawn Vaughn, RB, Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Positional Rank: 6
Pre-Draft Overall Rank: 17
Tier: 5

Vaughn gets the biggest bump in my pre-draft rankings versus the post-draft ones. That'll happen when a player gets selected higher than anticipated, all while landing in the dream spot.

I still had Vaughn as a firm second-rounder before the draft happened, though, and was generally higher on him as a prospect than the consensus. He had a really complete profile that my model liked -- he had the second-best "stat score" heading into the draft.

It seems like he'll at least walk into a receiving role for the Buccaneers right away. Not only has Ronald Jones struggled at times as a receiver, but Vaughn had the second-highest final-season reception share in the class. What's intriguing is that head coach Bruce Arians noted that he wanted a three-down back prior to the draft and, post-draft, he said that "...Vaughn is a guy that can play every down."

Considering my prospect model was into him before things kicked off last week, Vaughn makes for an intriguing late first-round pick in rookie drafts.

11. Tee Higgins, WR, Cincinnati Bengals

Positional Rank: 5
Pre-Draft Overall Rank: 12
Tier: 5

If you're drafting Tee Higgins, you're doing so with the expectation that he's an A.J. Green replacement, and that he won't give you a ton of Year 1 production. There's nothing wrong with that -- dynasty isn't just about the short-term payoff. Higgins does have pretty serious competition in Year 1, though, with Green, Tyler Boyd, and John Ross still on the Cincinnati roster. We shouldn't expect him to blow up without an injury.

The comparable to Green is there. Both players are similar in size (they're 6'4'' with just a 5-pound difference), and their top-season in yards per team pass attempt were super close at 2.41 for Green and 2.29 for Higgins. Green ranks as almost a 99th percentile wideout in the model, but Higgins is still in the 91st. That tells us he has good odds to be successful as a fantasy asset in the NFL.

12. Henry Ruggs, WR, Las Vegas Raiders

Positional Rank: 6
Pre-Draft Overall Rank: 13
Tier: 5

There are plenty of red flags to Henry Ruggs' prospect profile, even when you considered his college competition. His best collegiate seasons in receptions per game, yards per team attempt, and touchdown share gave him a negative stat score in my model, and after being selected in the first round, he became just the 10th wide receiver since 2006 to be selected in the first while having a negative stat score. Of the other nine, none have been hits in fantasy football. And we've seen players with his profile get drafted in the top-half of the round -- two players have a negative stat score while being drafted in the top-20. Those names? Ted Ginn Jr. and Darrius Heyward-Bey.

Not great, Bob!

Nevertheless, Ruggs has a 90th percentile rank in my model, which gives him a decent chance to succeed. And I'd argue -- and I am arguing -- that his landing spot is really attractive for him to have a chance. Instead of Ruggs simply being a player who can spread defenses out and help his teammates get open, he's likely walking into volume, given the other pieces on the Vegas depth chart.

Not a ton of wide receivers have panned out with his type of profile, but we also haven't seen many wide receivers get drafted so high with said profile. That's an important caveat.

13. Denzel Mims, WR, New York Jets

Positional Rank: 7
Pre-Draft Overall Rank: 10
Tier: 5

There are four -- and maybe even five -- wide receivers who you could put in this 13 spot. That, to me, makes the 2.01 a little less attractive in single-quarterback rookie drafts, whereas it's an awesome spot to be in superflex formats.

We'll start with Mims because my pre-draft evaluation had him 10th overall, so clearly, something's there. He completely destroyed the combine, and that helped generate some buzz during the month or two before the draft started. He's got the right size (6'3'', 207 pounds) to dominate physically at the next level, too.

Here's my issue: he doesn't look all that great within my prospect model. His stat score is barely above-average after seeing a 2.35 yards per team pass attempt during his best collegiate season, which is completely average. His breakout age is fine, but he also didn't declare early, giving us another red flag.

The landing spot for Mims should allow him to produce right away. In fact, given the Jets' wide receiver group, I wouldn't be shocked if Mims is the top rookie wide receiver scorer in Year 1. Beyond that? There are some question marks.

14. Michael Pittman, WR, Indianapolis Colts

Positional Rank: 8
Pre-Draft Overall Rank: 10
Tier: 5

Analytically, the downside with Pittman is that he broke out later than we'd like to see, and he played all four years in college. He wasn't an early declare. But things were strong from a production standpoint, where his best season in receptions per game, yards per team attempt, and touchdown share were all good enough to give him an above-average stat score.

Pittman's most intriguing because of his size (6'4'', 223 pounds) and ability to become a true alpha in the league. And going to Indianapolis will allow him to produce right away. He could end up being a steal in rookie drafts.

15. Brandon Aiyuk, WR, San Francisco 49ers

Positional Rank: 9
Pre-Draft Overall Rank: 18
Tier: 5

The issue I had with Aiyuk before the draft started was that we've only really seen him produce at a high rate for one season, unless you count his days playing JUCO ball. After transferring to Arizona State for his Junior year, Aiyuk played behind N'Keal Harry, and he didn't produce until last year when Harry was gone. The poor breakout age is a concern.

But you've got to love the fit after being selected in the first round by the 49ers. Kyle Shanahan has been building San Francisco's offense with yards after the catch freaks, and Aiyuk fits the mold. According to PFF's data, Aiyuk ranked eighth in college football last year in yards after the catch per reception. There's a chance -- there's potential -- he ends up seeing more work than Deebo Samuel in the offense down the line.

16. Laviska Shenault, WR, Jacksonville Jaguars

Positional Rank: 10
Pre-Draft Overall Rank: 11
Tier: 5

Placing Laviska Shenault at 16 is a perfect example as to why rankings can be annoying. Realistically, I wouldn't fault anyone for taking Shenault at the beginning of the second round of a 12-team rookie draft. He's very good, having entered the draft with the fifth-best stat score in my model.

The reason he's ranked here -- keep in mind, he's in one giant tier -- is because of his medicals. Shenault had a core muscle injury this offseason, and he was banged up throughout the 2018 and 2019 seasons at Colorado. His range of outcomes includes being one of the best wide receivers in this class, and without the health issues, he might've been a first-round pick. His health is just an easy tiebreaker to use in this big tier of strong wideouts.

17. Joe Burrow, QB, Cincinnati Bengals

Positional Rank: 1
Pre-Draft Overall Rank: 20
Tier: 6

If you're taking a passer in a single-quarterback dynasty format, it's either because you've got a big need, or your team is so good that it's a luxury pick. In the end, dynasty quarterbacks hold more value than they do in regular redraft leagues, sure, but running backs and wide receivers still run things.

Burrow is my QB1 because Burrow could be special. His lack of production across multiple seasons is a concern, but because his numbers were so good last year, it's easy to push that concern aside. Some may be down on the landing spot, but Cincinnati has an offensive-minded coaching staff to go along with a lot of good, young pieces at the skill positions.

18. Bryan Edwards, WR, Las Vegas Raiders

Positional Rank: 11
Pre-Draft Overall Rank: 16
Tier: 6

The Raiders' offensive moves in the draft made a ton of sense to me. They're giving Derek Carr zero excuses by surrounding him with players who can do serious work with the ball in their hands. That includes Bryan Edwards, who saw one of the highest rates of screen passes in college football last year. That pairs up nicely with Carr, who consistently has a low average depth of target. Edwards has one of the best college breakout ages you'll find, and he could easily end up being a favorite target in Vegas' up-in-the-air receiving group.

19. Zack Moss, RB, Buffalo Bills

Positional Rank: 7
Pre-Draft Overall Rank: 14
Tier: 6

Moss had a complete college production profile after rushing for 1,000-plus yards in each of the last three seasons. The bigger-bodied back even had a 12% reception share last year. The knock on Moss is more athleticism-driven. His 4.65 40-yard dash gave off David Montgomery vibes and, as we saw last year, Montgomery doesn't look like a game-changing back.

Falling to Buffalo means Moss will be splitting the Bills' backfield with Devin Singletary, who had a solid rookie campaign in a shared backfield with Frank Gore last year. That means Moss may not be utilized much as a pass-catcher -- in 12 games last year, Singletary had close to a 9% target share. Moss should be able to handle goal-line work right away, though, since Singletary carried the ball within the opponent's five-yard line just twice last season. And, who knows, maybe Moss shows up and is able to take a bigger portion of that split than we think.

20. Tua Tagovailoa, QB, Miami Dolphins

Positional Rank: 2
Pre-Draft Overall Rank: 24
Tier: 7

According to a study on statistically superior quarterbacks from numberFire's own Jim Sannes, Tua actually has the best analytical profile among all signal-callers in this class. Even against tough competition, he was awesome -- Tagovailoa's adjusted yards per attempt rate was still 12.1 against top-50 defenses. Did his weapons help? I'm sure. But a quarterback can't put up those types of numbers based solely on the weapons around him.

The Dolphins are building in a smart way, too. They didn't waste an early-round pick on a running back despite all the draft capital they had and, instead, they beefed up their offensive line big time. If Tua's health isn't a concern, he should be a solid fantasy producer for years.

21. AJ Dillon, RB, Green Bay Packers

Positional Rank: 8
Pre-Draft Overall Rank: 26
Tier: 7

Hands down, one of the biggest surprises of the draft was when the Packers decided to get A.J. Dillon in the second round. They do have Aaron Jones and Jamaal Williams on the final year of their deals, but the expectation was that they'd lean wide receiver, not running back. Let alone a big-bodied running back in the second round.

There's a lot of AJ Dillon hate out there, and while I get it to a degree, I've never viewed him as an Andre Williams-type prospect. Williams, who was also a truck-sized back out of Boston College, didn't catch a single pass during his Senior season at BC despite 355 carries. Dillon had a final-season reception share of over 8%. It's a below-average number, but it's not that bad.

Things could really break Dillon's way in Year 2. What if Green Bay doesn't re-sign Jones and Williams? What if Dillon's freakish size-speed combo really translates, and he's able to take over that backfield? That's the type of upside you love to get in the second round. There's risk, but there's also a clear path to Dillon being a huge value.

22. Anthony McFarland, RB, Pittsburgh Steelers

Positional Rank: 9
Pre-Draft Overall Rank: 30
Tier: 7

The Steelers found the perfect backfield companion for James Conner when they selected Anthony McFarland in the fourth round. While Conner's looking like a 15ish carry per game player this year, McFarland can step in and change the pace up dramatically with his 4.44 speed. He split a backfield in Maryland with undrafted Javon Leake, and over the last two seasons, McFarland out-attempted Leake 245 to 136. All the while, he was the more competent pass-catcher, hauling in 14 more receptions. He's already beaten out an NFLer (Leake was signed after going undrafted), and perhaps he can do that again once Conner becomes a free agent in 2021.

23. Joshua Kelley, RB, Los Angeles Chargers

Positional Rank: 10
Pre-Draft Overall Rank: Unranked
Tier: 7

Kelley wasn't in my pre-draft top-30, but it was only because this is a loaded class. He's a good running back. My model looks at final-season numbers for running backs, and that hurt Kelley a bit because his reception share dropped from 11.3% in 2018 to just 4.2% in 2019. The good news in terms of fit in the NFL is that he's walking onto a team with one of the best pass-catching backs in the league in Austin Ekeler.

Ekeler's an awesome running back, but he's also never carried a full workload in the NFL. Even when Melvin Gordon was sidelined last year, Ekeler managed to see roughly 64% of the Chargers' running back rushes per game. That number was hit by 14 running backs across the league during the 2019 season, and if you include backs who missed time, that number would be even higher.

To put this another way, there's opportunity for immediate early-down work in the Chargers offense. And given Kelley's bigger frame and higher-than-normal touchdown share, he could be in store for some goal-line work as well.

24. Antonio Gibson, RB, Washington Redskins

Positional Rank: 11
Pre-Draft Overall Rank: 25
Tier: 7

Gibson's one of the toughest players to rank in this class because he's electric, athletic, and fun to watch, but he also lacked the production that you'd like to see from any player coming out of school. At Memphis last year, he caught 38 passes while running the ball 33 times. There's not much of a sample to work off of, and, as we know, college production matters when evaluating these guys.

But, man, it's so hard to fade Gibson. On 77 career touches -- according to PFF's Mike Renner -- Gibson broke 33 freaking tackles. And after running a 4.39 at the combine, Gibson came through with a 99th percentile Speed Score, which adjusts 40 time for weight. He's 228 pounds and he ran a sub-4.4, people.

If Washington can find ways to get him the ball, the sky's the limit.

25. Justin Herbert, QB, Los Angeles Chargers

Positional Rank: 3
Pre-Draft Overall Rank: Unranked
Tier: 8

The last worthwhile quarterback selection in single-quarterback leagues is Justin Herbert, who'll be the one handing the ball off to the aforementioned Joshua Kelley. As Sannes notes in his quarterback study, Herbert's statistical profile is intriguing because he's both young and experienced. That's a major plus. But, as Sannes noted, his numbers saw a boost via some easy-to-make throws, and PFF's data backs that up: last season, Herbert ranked second in screen pass yards and 72nd in average depth of target.

There's some fantasy upside given his athleticism and supporting cast in LA. He's not on Burrow or Tua's level, but Herbert has a shot to be a solid QB2 in fantasy moving forward.

26. Darrynton Evans, RB, Tennessee Titans

Positional Rank: 12
Pre-Draft Overall Rank: 23
Tier: 8

Some may be down on Evans after being drafted by the Titans, but like a lot of backs in this class, there's upside for the 2021 season. Derrick Henry is franchise tagged and doesn't have a contract beyond 2020, so who knows what goes down after this season's over.

Evans profiles as a really good complementary piece to Henry anyway. He was a do-it-all back at Appalachian State, getting involved as a rusher, pass-catcher, and kick returner. His 4.41 speed at a leaner frame should be a nice change of pace for Henry this year, but if Evans flashes, he'll have a chance to grab hold of a larger role in 2021 and beyond.

27. Chase Claypool, WR, Pittsburgh Steelers

Positional Rank: 12
Pre-Draft Overall Rank: 27
Tier: 8

Claypool and his 6'4'', 238-pound frame would've been a more valuable fantasy asset if the team that drafted him planned on using him as a tight end, but that's not the case with the Steelers. He'll likely play on the outside, moving JuJu Smith-Schuster to a more productive role in the slot.

Maybe he works out better than most expect, but there wasn't anything worthwhile about his analytical profile aside from freakish athleticism. He was barely above average in stat score, he wasn't an early declare, and his breakout happened after Age 21. The situation isn't bad, but there are questions about Claypool as a wide receiver.

28. Antonio Gandy-Golden, WR, Washington Redskins

Positional Rank: 13
Pre-Draft Overall Rank: Unranked
Tier: 9

Gandy-Golden just missed my top-30 pre-draft, but the draft capital spent to get him combined with a strong landing spot for immediate production pushed him into the mix post-draft. Gandy-Golden had a really strong stat score in my model, with a best-season yards per team attempt rate that was fifth-best in the class at wide receiver. He also had an obscene 62.5% touchdown share in 2018. That's not all that predictive -- it's just ridiculous and needs to be noted.

Maybe you want to discount all of his production numbers because he played at Liberty. OK, cool. At the very least, you have to like his 6'4'', 223-pound size, which is something that's missing from the Washington offense. There's volatility to his outlook, but he's at least a fun and interesting prospect to target.

29. KJ Hamler, WR, Denver Broncos

Positional Rank: 14
Pre-Draft Overall Rank: 22
Tier: 9

Hamler brings some serious speed to the Broncos' offense. He didn't run at the combine, and his pro day got canceled, but he's claimed to have run a 4.27 40-yard dash, which is...fast.

After playing almost 92% of his snaps from the slot over the last two seasons at Penn State (per PFF), Hamler's likely to fill that role in Denver, playing alongside Jerry Jeudy and Courtland Sutton. There's questionable upside given his size (176 pounds) and competition in the offense, but if things begin clicking for Drew Lock, Hamler can be fantasy viable.

30. Devin Duvernay, WR, Baltimore Ravens

Positional Rank: 15
Pre-Draft Overall Rank: 29
Tier: 9

Rounding out the top-30 is Baltimore wideout Devin Duvernay, who's another speedy pass-catcher for Lamar Jackson to throw to. Duvernay spent the majority of his time in the slot last season, and his numbers exploded: after three straight seasons under 600 yards receiving, Duvernay went for 1,386 last year. He can compete in that area of the field right away for Baltimore, though head coach Jon Harbaugh says that he can run routes from everywhere.

Duvernay's sub-4.4 speed will work really well with Lamar Jackson's arm, but he enters an offense that's not likely to be super pass-heavy in the immediate future.

Players just outside the top-30: Lynn Bowden, Van Jefferson, Eno Benjamin, DeeJay Dallas